background image

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation

You are almost done with the Debian install! There are now only a few more steps you need 

to take.  If you desire, you can take a break here and start from this chapter at another time.  But, if 
you're ready to go, let's get started.

1. First, let's set up your networking connection.  It is ideal to use a wired network connection 

for security reasons.  If you left your wired connection plugged in, Debian's network 
manager should automatically detect it and connect to the Internet.  If you prefer to remain 
using a wired connection only, you can skip to Step 9.
  

If you configured a Wi-Fi connection during the initial Debian configuration in 
Chapter 1D, skip to step 4.

If you have not created a Wi-Fi connection, click on the area in the top right corner of your 
desktop with the network, speaker, battery and downward arrow icon, then click on “Wi-Fi” 
and then click on “Select Network.”

 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

2. In the window that appears, click on your Wi-Fi connect and click “connect.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

3. When you are prompted for your Wi-Fi password, type your password and click “Connect.”

NOTE: If your router is still configured to use WEP for authentication, you should 
change it to WPA2 immediately. WEP is notoriously insecure and can often be cracked 
in less than 1 minute.

4. Now, you should edit the settings for your Wi-Fi connection. Click on the area in the top 

right corner of your desktop with the network, speaker, battery and downward arrow icon, 
then click on “Wi-Fi” and then click on “Wi-Fi Settings.”  

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

5. When the Network Manager window appears, click on the icon shaped like a gear next to 

your Wi-Fi connection profile.   

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

6. When the next window appears, click on “Identity” in the left region. Then, uncheck the 

checked box next to “connect automatically” towards the bottom of the window.

NOTE: If you add additional Wi-Fi connections later, it is worth repeating this for each new 
connection to avoid creating a potential fingerprint.  For example, if your laptop attempts to 
connect to multiple specific Wi-Fi routers in public automatically, this can create a unique 
fingerprint that machines can sniff and could be used to correlate your location at a specific 
time.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

7. Next, click on the “IPv6” tab in the left region of the window.  If you do not intend to use 

the IPv6 protocol, set the slider for “IPv6” in the upper right portion of the window to 
“OFF” and then click the “Apply” button.

If you intend to use the IPv6 protocol, simply click on the “Apply” button without changing 
anything.

 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

8. When you are returned to the network manager window, click the “X” in the upper right 

corner to close the window.  To connect to your wireless connection now and in the future, 
simply follow the same process described in steps 1-2 of this chapter.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

9. When you are back at the Debian desktop, click on “Applications” in the upper left corner, 

then choose “Utilities” and scroll down to “Terminal.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

10. Next, type “sudo -i” at the command prompt. When prompted for your password, type the 

same password you chose for “user” in step 13 of chapter 1D. 

NOTE: Whenever you use this command from a terminal session, you will have full 
root/administrative access until you “exit” the session. 
Thus, be extra cautious in your 
session whenever you decide to use this command. The changes you make can be 
damaging and permanent if you do something wrong.

ADDTIONAL NOTE: If you wish to use “copy and paste” throughout the guide for any 
terminal commands in the Debian Host OS, press “CTRL-SHIFT-V” to paste what you 
copied from this guide into a terminal session.

11. Next, configure Debian's clock to run by “Universal Time Code (UTC).” 

Type “dpkg-reconfigure tzdata” and press the “enter” key.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

12. In the window that appears, use your down arrow key to go to the bottom of the list until 

“None of the above” is highlighted and press “enter.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

13. On the next screen, if “UTC” is not highlighted by default, use the up or down arrows until 

“UTC” is highlighted and press “enter.”  The options are listed alphabetically.

14. Next, install a firewall for debian. This will add an extra layer of protection against potential 

network intrusions.  Ufw is a software that will configure firewall rules for your OS. At the 
command prompt, type “apt-get install ufw” and press “enter.” 

15. Now, you are going to modify the settings for your firewall rules to disable various ICMP 

network traffic. This should not pose any problems for you and will narrow your potential 
attack surface further. Type “nano /etc/ufw/before.rules” and press “enter.”  

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

16. On the next screen, press “LEFT-CTRL+W” to open a search query in the editor.  Then, 

type “icmp” and press “enter.”

17. Your cursor will move to a line containing “# ok icmp codes.” There are 5 entries that you 

need to change that are highlighted in red below.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

Type a “#” sign at the beginning of each of the 5 lines to comment them out. Your screen 
should look like the picture below when complete.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

18. Now, save the file and exit Nano. Press “LEFT-CTRL+X” and type “Y” when prompted to 

save the modified buffer. 

Then, press “enter” when prompted to choose a file name.

19. Next, enable your firewall.  Type “ufw enable” at the command prompt and press “enter.” 

UFW should inform you that it is active. It will remain active through every reboot.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

20. IMPORTANT NOTE

 

 : For the purposes of this tutorial, it is assumed that you live in a 

jurisdiction where connecting to the Tor Network is not something that has any legal 
consequence. However, this is not the case in all jurisdictions throughout the world. 
Please make sure that connecting to the Tor Network is something that is safe in your 
locale. If you are not confident that using the Tor Network is safe in your locale, please 
research the issue before executing this step or proceeding further with this guide.

Now, it is time to install tor and apt-transport-tor. Tor is a strong anonymizing proxy service. 
Apt-transport-tor will ensure that all future Debian updates or software installs are 
implemented via the Debian Organization's Tor hidden services.  This will hide what 
operating system you are using from various potential snoopers. 
Type “apt-get install tor apt-transport-tor” and press “enter.”  When you are prompted to 
type yes or no, press “enter.”

21. Next, you need to configure Debian to install operating system updates and software installs 

over Tor hidden services. Type “nano /etc/apt/sources.list” and press “enter.”

 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

22. The following screen will appear:

Continue to next page.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

Hold down the “Control” key and the “K” key at the same time (CTRL-K) until the screen is 
empty and looks like the screen shot below.

23. Next, type the following lines into the window:

deb tor+http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion/debian jessie main contrib
deb tor+http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion/debian jessie-updates main contrib
deb tor+http://sgvtcaew4bxjd7ln.onion/debian-security jessie/updates main contrib

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

24.

Now, save the file and exit Nano. Press “LEFT-CTRL+X” and type “Y” when prompted to save the 
modified buffer. 

Then, press “enter” when prompted to choose a file name.

25. The next couple steps will disable TCP Timestamps.  This will prevent attackers from 

gaining a potential mechanism to identify you, particularly if you ever use software in 
Whonix that requires an Onion host on your machine (some various chat programs for 
example).

Type “echo "net.ipv4.tcp_timestamps = 0" > /etc/sysctl.d/tcp_timestamps.conf” and 
press “enter.”

26. Now, load the file you just created to set the policy for TCP Timestamping in the Debian 

host.  Type “sysctl -p /etc/sysctl.d/tcp_timestamps.conf” and press “enter.”

27. OPTIONAL STEP: Some people are concerned about various leaks with the IPv6 protocol. 

Unless you need the IPv6 protocol for network connectivity, you can disable it. If you wish 
to disable the IPv6 protocol, type “nano /etc/default/grub” and press “enter.” If you don't 
want to disable the IPv6 protocol, skip to step 31.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

28. OPTIONAL STEP: Move the cursor down to the line that begins with 

“GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT. After the " mark that follows the = sign, 
type “ipv6.disable=1 ” so that your screen looks like the image below.

29. OPTIONAL STEP: Now, save the file and exit Nano. Press “LEFT-CTRL+X” and type 

Y” when prompted to save the modified buffer. 

Then, press “enter” when prompted to choose a file name.

30. OPTIONAL STEP: Next, update grub so your grub menu entries contain the variable to 

disable the IPv6 protocol. Type “update-grub” and press “enter.”

After you reboot your machine, the IPv6 protocol will be disabled for future use sessions.

31. Now, you can exit the root environment. Type “exit” and press “enter.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

32. Next, type “cd Downloads” to change your directory to the Downloads directory. You are 

going to download all of the Whonix related files here.

33. Now you are going to download the Whonix-Gateway virtual machine. You will use a 

program called “wget” to download the file. If the connection gets interrupted for any 
reason, using the following command will continue downloading the Whonix-Gateway 
anonymously over the Tor Network from where you left off. Type 
torsocks wget -c https://download.whonix.org/linux/13.0.0.1.4/Whonix-Gateway-
13.0.0.1.4.ova
”and press “Enter.”

34. When you have successfully downloaded the Whonix-Gateway, it is time to download the 

Whonix-Workstation. Type 
torsocks wget -c https://download.whonix.org/linux/13.0.0.1.4/Whonix-Workstation-
13.0.0.1.4.ova
” and press “enter.”

35. Now, download the verification signatures for the Whonix virtual machines. The verification 

signatures will allow you to test if the virtual machines have been tampered with. First, 
download the Whonix Gateway OpenPGP Signature. Type 
torsocks wget -c https://download.whonix.org/linux/13.0.0.1.4/Whonix-Gateway-
13.0.0.1.4.ova.asc
” and press “enter.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

36. Next, download the Whonix Workstation OpenPGP Signature. Type

torsocks wget -c https://download.whonix.org/linux/13.0.0.1.4/Whonix-Workstation-
13.0.0.1.4.ova.asc
” and press “enter.”

37. Now, download the Whonix Signing Key. Type 

torsocks wget https://www.whonix.org/patrick.asc” and press “enter.”

38. Next, verify the signature key using its fingerprint. Type “gpg --with-fingerprint 

patrick.asc” and press “enter.”

When finished, your screen should look the same as the one below. In particular, you need to 
check that the email address for adrelanos and the associated fingerprint look the same as 
they do in the image below. If they do not, you have a bad signature. Download it again as 
described in step 31. 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

39. Now, import the developer's signature key by typing “gpg --import patrick.asc” and 

pressing “enter.” 

When finished, your screen should look similar to the one below. You may see some various 
errors or warnings. None of these are usually of any significance and will likely relate to the 
fact that you haven't used GPG to create your own key yet. The output of importance to you 
is highlighted in red below.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

40. Next, test the integrity of Whonix-Gateway-13.0.0.1.4.ova by typing:

 
gpg --verify-options show-notations -v Whonix-Gateway-*.ova.asc and then press 
“enter.” This may take a short while. 

When the verification is done, your screen should look similar to the screen shot below. If 
you see “gpg: Good signature from "Patrick Schleizer <adrelanos@riseup.net>”” and 
gpg: Signature notation: file@name=Whonix-Gateway-13.0.0.1.4.ova” on your screen, 
then you have successfully verified the integrity of the image. The warnings that appear 
after that line can be ignored. However, if you see “gpg: BAD signature from "Patrick 
Schleizer <adrelanos@riseup.net>”” or a file@name that is different than “Whonix-
Gateway-13.0.0.1.4.ova” on your screen, delete the image and do not use it.
  This means 
the image has probably been tampered with or got corrupted during the download process.  
Try downloading the image again at a later time.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

41. Now, test the integrity of Whonix-Workstation-13.0.0.1.4.ova by typing: 

gpg --verify-options show-notations -v Whonix-Workstation-*.ova.asc and then press 
“enter.” This may take a short while.

When the verification is done, your screen should look similar to the screen shot below. If 
you see “gpg: Good signature from "Patrick Schleizer <adrelanos@riseup.net>”” and 
“gpg: Signature notation: file@name=Whonix-Workstation-13.0.0.1.4.ova” on your 
screen, then you have successfully verified the integrity of the image. The warnings that 
appear after that line can be ignored. However, if you see “gpg: BAD signature from 
"Patrick Schleizer <adrelanos@riseup.net>”” or a file@name that is different than 
“Whonix-Workstation-13.0.0.1.4.ova” on your screen, delete the image and do not use 
it.
  This means the image has probably been tampered with or got corrupted during the 
download process.  Try downloading the image again at a later time.

42. Now, change back to your home directory. Type “cd” and press “enter.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

43. In this step, you will disable Tor so that it does not automatically run at startup each time 

you boot your host operating system. Type “sudo systemctl disable tor.service” and press 
“enter.” When prompted for your password, type the same password you chose for “user” in 
step 13 of chapter 1D.

44. Next, you will create a new command alias to update the Debian operating system.  This 

will create a shell command entitled “dist-upgrade” will enable Tor, pause for 10 seconds 
while Tor builds a circuit, download Debian operating system updates, and run the “apt-get 
dist-upgrade” command to install any new updates.  After updates are installed, if any are 
available, it will disable Tor again.  Type the following as one line:

echo "alias dist-upgrade='sudo systemctl start tor.service && sleep 10 && sudo apt-
get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade && sudo apt-get clean && sudo systemctl 
stop tor.service'" >> .bashrc

Press the “enter” key after you've typed the above as one line

45. Now, create a function command for installing new software packages.  This will create a 

shell command entitled “apt-install” that will enable Tor, pause for 10 seconds while Tor 
builds a circuit, updates the software repositories and runs the “apt-get install” command to 
download and install the software package specified on the command line.  After the 
software package is installed, Tor will be disabled again.  Type the following as one line:

echo "function apt-install() { sudo systemctl start tor.service; sleep 10; sudo apt-get 
update; sudo apt-get install "\$@"; sudo apt-get clean; sudo systemctl stop 
tor.service; }" >> .bashrc

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

46. Next, you need to load your new command aliases for their first time use. 

Type “source .bashrc” and press “enter.”

47. When you are returned to the command prompt, install VirtualBox.  VirtualBox is used to 

run the Whonix images which you will download later. You will use the “apt-install” 
command function to perform this task. Type “apt-install virtualbox” and press “enter.” 
When prompted for your password, type the same password you chose for “user” in step 13 
of chapter 1D. 

Then, when prompted to type “Y/n”, press “enter.” 

IMPORTANT NOTE: “apt-install” is the command to use in the future to install individual 
programs on your host operating system. However, it is strongly recommended that you 
only use your host operating system for the purpose of hosting Whonix. Therefore, 
installing unnecessary programs on your Debian host operating system for general use 
is strongly discouraged!

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

48. Next, run “dist-upgrade” to check for updates and install any that are available. 

Type “dist-upgrade” and press enter.  In the future, running “dist-upgrade” will likely 
prompt you to enter the password you chose for “user” in step 13 of chapter 1D.

IMPORTANT NOTE: “dist-upgrade” is the command used to check for security 
updates and other software updates for your Debian host operating system.  Therefore, 
it is important to run this program frequently in order to keep the software on your 
computer up to date. Running the program once a day will be sufficient.

49. You can now close your terminal. Type “exit” and press “enter.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

50. Now it's time to import the Whonix images into VirtualBox. When you are back at the 

Debian desktop, click on “Applications” in the upper left corner, then choose “Accessories” 
and scroll down to “VirtualBox.”  Click on “VirtualBox.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

51. In the window that appears, click on “File” in the upper left corner and then click on “Import 

Appliance.”

52. When the “Import Virtual Appliance” window appears, click on the button with the folder 

icon towards the right side of the window.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

53. In the next window, click on “Downloads” in the left region.  Then, click on “Whonix-

Gateway-13.0.0.1.4.ova” and click “Open.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

54. When you are returned to the “Import Virtual Appliance” window, click the “Next” button.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

55. Then the “Appliance Import Wizard” appears, click on “Import.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

56. A “Software License Agreement” window will pop up informing you of various 

information, including what to do if you intend to run the Whonix Gateway on low RAM 
systems. Click “Agree” to continue.

57. When the import process is complete, make a snapshot of the Whonix Gateway virtual 

machine. This will provide you with an easy back up to restore from in case your virtual 
machine ever has problems. Click on the button that says “Snapshots” in the upper right 
corner of the VirtualBox Manager.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

58. Click on the icon that looks like a camera located above “Current State.”

59. A window will pop up entitled “Take a Snapshot of Virtual Machine.” Choose an 

appropriate label for your snapshot, or just accept the default, and click “OK.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

60. After you have taken the snapshot, click on “File” in the upper left corner and then click on 

“Import Appliance.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

61. When the “Import Virtual Appliance” window appears, click on the button with the folder 

icon towards the right side of the window.

62. In the next window, click on “Downloads” in the left region.  Then, click on “Whonix-

Workstation-13.0.0.1.4.ova” and click “Open.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

63. When you are returned to the “Import Virtual Appliance” window, click the “Next” button.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

64. When the “Appliance Import Wizard” appears, click on “Import.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

65. A “Software License Agreement” window will pop up informing you of various 

information, including what to do if you intend to run the Whonix Gateway on low RAM 
systems. Click “Agree” to continue.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

66. When the import process is complete, make a snapshot of the Whonix Workstation virtual 

machine. This will provide you with an easy back up to restore from in case your virtual 
machine ever has problems. Click on “Whonix-WorkStation” and then click on the button 
that says “Snapshots” in the upper right corner of the VirtualBox Manager.

67. Click on the icon that looks like a camera located above “Current State.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

68. A window will pop up entitled “Take a Snapshot of Virtual Machine.” Choose an 

appropriate label for your snapshot, or just accept the default, and click “OK.”

69. [OPTIONAL STEP] To conserve space, you can now delete the Whonix files you 

downloaded. Click on “Places” in the upper right region of your Desktop and then click 
“Downloads.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

70. [OPTIONAL STEP] Select all the files in your “Downloads” folder. Then, right-click on 

the any of the files and choose “Move to Trash.” 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

71. [OPTIONAL STEP] Next, click on the “Trash” icon towards the lower left side of the 

“Downloads Folder” window and click “Empty Trash” in the upper right side of the 
window.

72. [OPTIONAL STEP] When asked if you wish to “empty all items from Trash, “click on 

“Empty Trash.” This will free roughly 4.1 gigabytes of hard drive space.

After you have emptied the Wastebasket, you can close the file explorer window.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

 

73. [APPLE USER OPTIONAL STEP. Skip to step 75 if you don't use an Apple computer.] 

A common annoyance for Mac users with VirtualBox is the default setting for “Right-Ctrl” 
as the Host Key in VirtualBox.  If you use a Mac, you can change this now.  In the 
VirtualBox Manager window that should now be on your screen, click on “File → 
Preferences.”

 

74. [APPLE USER OPTIONAL STEP. Skip to step 75 if you don't use an Apple computer.] 

In the window that appears, click on the entry that says “Input.” Then, click on the “Virtual 
Machine” tab. Then, click in the area under “Shortcut” next to the “Host Key Combination” 
area that displays “Right-Ctrl.” After you've click on it, type the key that you wish to use as 
a Host Key in the future. This should be a key you don't use for regular typing.  The 
“option” key may suffice.  When you've changed the Host Key, click the “OK” button.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

75. Now you should tweak a couple settings in Debian. Click on the area in the top right corner 

of your desktop with the network, speaker, battery and downward arrow icon, then click on 
the icon that looks like tools in the lower left region.  

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

76. In the window that appears, click on “User Accounts” which is towards the bottom.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

77. In the next screen, click on the “unlock” button in the upper right corner.

78. You will be prompted for your user password. Type it and click “authenticate.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

79. Click on the button that is in the “OFF” position next to “Automatic Login.” When switched 

“ON,” this will remove the requirement to type your user password to login to Debian on 
boot. Since you have an encrypted hard drive with a passphrase, this extra login check is not 
necessary. After you have set “Automatic Login” to “ON,” click on the back arrow button in 
the upper left region of the window.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

80. Next, you need to disable all of your microphone/sound inputs. VirtualBox does not 

currently have a setting to disable sound input in its current version. As a result, booting a 
virtual machine can enable your microphone (if you have one) which is a security hazard. 
Click on the “Sound” icon in system settings.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

81. In the next screen, click on the “Input” tab. Then, Click on the “ON/OFF” button next to the 

Input Volume bar to set the device to “OFF.” Do this for all of your microphones and audio 
input devices.  Then, click the back button in the upper left region of your window. 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

82. Next, click on the “Privacy” icon.

83. In the “Privacy” window that appears, click on “Usage & History.”

84. Next, set the switch next to “Recently Used” to the “OFF” position.  Then, click on the 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

“Clear Recent History” button and then click the “x” button in the upper right corner.

85. When you are returned to the “Privacy” window, click on “Purge Trash & Temporary Files.”

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

86. Now, set the switches next to “Automatically empty Trash” and “Automatically purge 

Temporary Files” to the “ON” position.  Then, select “1 day” from the options in the pull-
down menu next to “Purge After.” Finally, click the “x” button in the upper right corner.

 

87. When you are returned to the “Pirvacy” window, click the “x” button in the upper right 

corner.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

88. Now you are ready to run Whonix for the first time.  In the “Oracle VM VirtualBox 

Manager,” click on “Whonix Gateway” and click “Start.”  Since this might be your first 
time using VirtualBox, there is an issue that may confuse.
  When you run a virtual 
machine in “full screen” mode, you may have dificulty figuring out how to switch between 
windows. To switch to other windows or escape from the virtual machine in full screen 
mode, simply press the “Right Control Key” and VirtualBox will release the control from 
the virtual machine.  Then, press “ALT-TAB” to switch to other windows.

Note: Depending upon the size and resolution of your monitor, you may discover that the 
Whonix Gateway window cannot display everything and, as a result, has scrollbars.  To 
work around this, you can either run the Whonix Gateway in “Scaled Mode” by pressing 
RIGHT-CTRL C” or in “Full Screen Mode” by pressing “RIGHT-CTRL F.”  If you wish 
to exit either mode, you simply press the same keys used to enable them.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

89. A window will appear to start the Whonix Gateway boot sequence.  You'll first see the 

GRUB menu.  You can let it automatically boot with the default.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

90. Since it is your first time running the Whonix Gateway, it is going to run through a number 

of procedures and reboot once.  Eventually, when it finishes its boot process, a window will 
appear which is the wizard for the initial configuration of Whonix.  Click on 
“Understood/Verstanden” and then click the “Next” button. 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

91. On the next screen that appears, click on “Understood/Verstanden” and click on the “Next” 

button to continue. 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

92. The next window will ask if you wish to enable Tor. Select “I am read to enable Tor” and 

click on the next button.

93. Next, a window should appear telling you that Tor is enabled. Click the “Next” button.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

94. The wizard will now prompt you that it is going to begin the “Whonix Repository Wizard.” 

Click the “Next” button.

95. The next screen will ask if you wish to “automatically install updates from the Whonix 

Team.” Choose “yes” and click on the “Next” button.

96. At the next screen, choose “Whonix Stable Repository” and click the “Next” button.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

97. On the next screen, click the “Next” button to continue.

98. The next screen will inform you that the Whonix Setup has completed.  Click the “Next” 

button to continue.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

99. The next screen will inform you that the Whonix Gateway is never to be used for regularly 

browsing or similar networking activities.  This is important advice to follow.  Always use 
the Whonix Workstation for your general use.  Click the “Finish” button to continue.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

100.

The Whonix Gateway will now go through a procedure to check the status of the Tor 

connection and to check for software updates. When the procedures finish, you should see a 
window appear similar to the screen shot below. Click on the “OK” button to close it.

 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

101.

Now you should be at the Whonix Gateway Desktop. It's time to change the default 

passwords and install the latest updates to the Whonix Gateway. Double click on the 
“Konsole” icon to get to a command prompt.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

102.

Eventually you will come to a command prompt.  At the command prompt, type 

sudo -i” and type “changeme” when prompted for “password for user.” 

103.

Now you need to change the default passwords.  Again, don't choose a password 

that's easy for a machine or human to guess. Type “passwd” and press “enter.” You will be 
prompted to enter a new password.  You will then be asked to confirm it.  If the process is 
successful, your screen will look like the screen shot below.

104.

Next, change the password for the “user” account on the Whonix Gateway.  Type 

passwd user” and press “enter.” You will be prompted to enter a new password.  You will 
then be asked to confirm it.  If the process is successful, your screen will look like the screen 
shot below.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

105.

Now, you will configure the Whonix Gateway to use the Debian Organization's and 

the Whonix Organization's Tor hidden services for future software installations and 
operating system updates. Type the following as one complete line:

echo deb http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion/debian jessie main contrib non-free > 
/etc/apt/sources.list.d/debian.list

106.

Next,  type the following as one complete line:

echo deb http://sgvtcaew4bxjd7ln.onion jessie/updates main contrib non-free >> 
/etc/apt/sources.list.d/debian.list

NOTE: Make sure you use “>>” in the line above.  This appends the data to the file 
you are writing. A single “>” will overwrite it completely which is not what you 
want to do.

107.

Now, type the following line to use Whonix's Tor hidden service repository:

whonix_repository --baseuri http://deb.kkkkkkkkkk63ava6.onion --enable 
--repository stable

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

108.

Next, it is time to update the Whonix Gateway with any recent patches or software 

upgrades. Type “apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade” and press “enter.”

Apt-get will download the most current list of packages and patches. When asked if you 
want to continue, type “y” and press “enter.”  Since this is your first time doing a system 
upgrade, it is likely that you will have a large amount of data to download.  Thus, this 
process may take some time.

Note: During the distribution upgrade process, you may be prompted to select various 
options. It is generally best to simply go with the defaults. If, however, you are ever 
prompted to overwrite a file, choose the option that keeps the original “local version” 
instead unless the new file has “.whonix” as a filename extension. 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

109.

When the process finishes and you are returned to the command prompt, click on the 

“x” to close the window.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

110.

Now it is time to prepare to start the Whonix Workstation. You need to get back to 

the VirtualBox Manager. However, when moving your mouse around, you'll probably notice 
that it is stuck inside the Whonix Gateway virtual machine window. This is by design. To 
release the mouse from the Whonix Gateway (or any virtual machine in the future), press the 
right-ctrl” key (or the equivalent key if you use an Apple computer). 

It will probably be more user friendly for you to run the Whonix Workstation in “Full Screen 
Mode.”  Unfortunately, a “Mini Toolbar” is present in VirtualBox's “Full Screen Mode” by 
default, which can cause the mouse pointer to seem sluggish when used near the bottom of 
the screen on a number of computers.  Before starting the Whonix Workstation, let's address 
that.  Click on “Whonix Workstation” in the VirtualBox Manager and then click the 
“Settings” button.

 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

111.

Next, click on the “Advanced” tab.  Then, click on the check box next to “Mini 

Toolbar” so it is unmarked.  Then, click the “OK” button.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

112.

Now, with the “Whonix-Workstation” selected, click the “Start” button.  

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

113.

A window will appear to start the Whonix Gateway boot sequence.  You'll first see 

the GRUB menu.  You can let it automatically boot with the default.  

NOTE: At this point, you will probably enjoy “Full Screen Mode” more. Press “RIGHT-
CTRL F
” to run it in “Full Screen Mode.”  If you wish to exit “Full Screen Mode,” simply 
press “RIGHT-CTRL F” again. 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

114.

Since it is your first time running the Whonix Workstation, it is going to run through 

a number of procedures and reboot once.  Eventually, when it finishes its boot process, the 
“Important Information About Whonix” window will appear. Click on 
“Understood/Verstanden” and then click the “Next” button to continue. 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

115.

Next, an additional “Important Information About Whonix” window will appear. 

Click on “Understood/Verstanden” and then click the “Next” button to continue. 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

116.

The next window will prompt you to begin the Whonix Repository Wizard. Click the 

“Next” button.

117.

The next window will ask if you wish to automatically install updates from the 

Whonix Team.  Choose “Yes” and click the “Next” button.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

118.

Next, you will be asked which repository you'd like to receive updates from. Choose 

“Whonix Stable Repository” and click the “Next” button.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

119.

The next window will tell you that updates will be automatically installed from the 

Whonix Team. Click the “Next” button to continue.

120.

At the next screen, you will be informed that the Whonix Setup Wizard is complete. 

Click the “Next” button to continue.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

121.

The Whonix Workstation will now go through a procedure to check the status of the 

Tor connection and to check for software updates. When it finishes, you will see a window 
appear similar to the screen shot below. Click on the “OK” button if visible, or the “x” in the 
upper right corner of the results window to close it.

 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

122.

Next, you need to get to a shell prompt.  Double click on the “Konsole” icon to open 

up a terminal and reach a shell command prompt.

123.

You need to reset the default passwords for the Whonix Workstation as well. 

Type “sudo -i”and press “enter.” When prompted to enter “password for user,” type 
changeme” and press “enter.”

124.

Now you need to change the default passwords.  Again, don't choose a password 

that's easy for a machine or human to guess. Type “passwd” and press “enter.” You will be 
prompted to enter a new password.  You will then be asked to confirm it.  If the process is 
successful, your screen will look like the screen shot below.

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

125.

Next, change the password for the “user” account on the Whonix Workstation. 

Type “passwd user” and press “enter.” You will be prompted to enter a new password.  You 
will then be asked to confirm it.  If the process is successful, your screen will look like the 
screen shot below.

126.

Now, you will configure the Whonix Workstation to use the Debian Organization's 

and the Whonix Organization's Tor hidden services for future software installations and 
operating system updates. Type the following as one complete line:

echo deb http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion/debian jessie main contrib non-free > 
/etc/apt/sources.list.d/debian.list

127.

Next,  type the following as one complete line:

echo deb http://sgvtcaew4bxjd7ln.onion jessie/updates main contrib non-free >> 
/etc/apt/sources.list.d/debian.list

NOTE: Make sure you use “>>” in the line above.  This appends the data to the file 
you are writing. A single “>” will overwrite it completely which is not what you 
want to do.

128.

Now, type the following line to use Whonix's Tor hidden service repository:

whonix_repository --baseuri http://deb.kkkkkkkkkk63ava6.onion --enable 
--repository stable

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

129.

Next, update the Whonix Workstation with any recent patches. Type 

apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade” and press “enter.”

Apt-get will download the most current list of packages and patches. When asked if you 
want to continue, type “y” and press “enter.”  Since this is your first time doing a system 
upgrade, it is likely that you will have a large amount of data to download.  Thus, this 
process may take some time. 

Note: During the distribution upgrade process, you may be prompted to select various options. It is 
generally best to simply go with the defaults. If, however, you are ever prompted to overwrite a file, 
choose the option that keeps the original “local version” instead unless the new file has “.whonix” 
as a filename extension. 

Chapter 3. Final Debian Tweaks and Whonix Installation
background image

130.

When the process finishes and you are returned to the command prompt, click on the 

“x” to close the window.

Congratulations! You have finished installing the “operating system” relating to the 
“Safer Anonymous OS.” Feel free to take a break here. The next chapters will deal 
with installing and/or using software in a secure and anonymous fashion over the 
Internet. You can take a break from here if you like.

Click here to continue to Chapter 4.